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Frequently Asked Questions


Drainage FAQS
Q: Am I in a floodplain?
A: Check the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Flood Insurance Maps or if the property is located in the Unincorporated Areas of Maricopa County you can call the Flood Control District’s Floodplain Division at (602) 506-2419 and ask for floodplain determination. Prior to calling make sure you have the Tax Assessor Number.

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Q: Do I need a site inspection?
A: Whether a site inspection is needed or not depends on the location of the site and if the Flood Control District already has drainage information for the site. The Flood Control District Representative downtown will determine if a site inspection is needed at the time of the plan submittal.

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Q: Do I need an engineer to prepare my plans?
A: Whether a site inspection is needed or not depends on the location of the site and if the Flood Control District already has drainage information for the site. The Flood Control District Representative downtown will determine if a site inspection is needed at the time of the plan submittal.

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Q: How do I get drainage clearance?
A: A Drainage Clearance is issued as part of the Building Permitting process. A site plan has to be submitted to the FCD Permitting Desk. The Plan is taken in and a decision is made whether a site investigation is required. If not, then the plan is either issued over the counter or sent to Durango for further review. If a site investigation is required, the applicant is told to stake the property corners of the building location and call the FCD for the site inspection. Once the inspection is performed the decision is made as to whether an engineer needs to be retained to provide hydrology and/or hydraulic information, or can we issue the Drainage Clearance only based upon minimal information such as drainage arrows and cross-sections. Once the final plans are prepared and sent to the FCD, they are reviewed and if all of the requirements are met they are approved. When all of the reviewing agencies are satisfied that the plan meets their requirements, a Drainage Clearance is issued as part of the County’s Permitting Process. For information call (602)506-8400.

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Q: How do I report a violation of the Drainage Regulations?
A: If you live east of I-17, call (602) 506-7717. If you live west of I-17, call (602) 506-5717. Be prepared to provide as much detail as possible, including the address or parcel number involved and a description of the suspected violation. If you choose to provide your name and phone number, efforts will be made to keep that information confidential.

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Q: How far away from the wash does my house need to be?
A: The location of the structure in proximity to a wash is dependent on the size of the wash, the amount of flow the wash carries, and if any bank stabilization is required. The Flood Control District Plan Reviewer will determine if a location is acceptable during the plan review. In general, stay away from all major washes. A good rule for proposed structures within twenty feet would be to provide bank protection and set the footers below the bottom elevation of the wash. For larger washes, a civil engineer will need to determine appropriate erosion control. Erosion control may need to meet Arizona State Standard 5-96.

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Q: What needs to be shown on the site plans?
A: Review the section “Plan Submittal Requirements”

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Q: When do I call for a final inspection?
A: After everything has been completed, all the concrete has been poured, all trenches have been filled, stockpiles/berms removed and the site has been rough graded. Click here to Request a Drainage Inspection

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Q: When do I call for a stem inspection?
A: Prior to pouring the stem walls. Have the contractor set up the height of the stemwalls for our inspector’s site visit. This should happen after the initial site plan has been approved. Call our inspection line at (602) 278-0871. Inspections for the next day need to be called in prior to 2:30 p.m. (This is an automated system). You can also request an inspection online. Click here to Request a Drainage Inspection

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Q: Where do I obtain a Building Permit or submit my plans?
A: Building Permits and Plans submittals are to be taken to 501 North 44th Street, Suite 200. For questions regarding Building Permit submittals, call (602) 506-3201. Applications and information regarding the submittal of building permits can be obtained from the County’s Fax on Demand line at (602) 506-0800. Status of building permit applications can be obtained at www.maricopa.gov/planning/

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Manufactured Housing FAQS
Q: Where can I place a manufactured home?
A: Any rural or residential lot in the unincorporated area of the county may be issued a development permit for the placement of one multi-sectional manufactured home built after June 15, 1976. The unit must be on a permanent foundation system, which means either on a slab/stem wall foundation or on a state approved system. Re-roofing, residing and structural additions must conform to the Maricopa County Comprehensive Building Code. A single-wide manufactured home may be located on a lot in a rural zoning district subject to a Special Use Permit approved by the Board of Supervisors. Single-wide manufactured homes are also allowed within a mobile subdivision or within a mobile home park. Modular homes (UBC approved) are allowed as a use by right in all rural and residential zoning districts.

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Q: What is the procedure for developing a mobile home park?
A: A Special Use Permit, approved by the Board of Supervisors, is required to develop a mobile home park. This takes approximately four to six months. Additionally, zoning clearances and building permits are also required.

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Q: What is the procedure for developing a mobile home subdivision?
A: A mobile home subdivision requires a Special Use Permit and subdivision approval. These applications can be processed concurrently. Full guarantees for site improvements are also required.

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Q: What is the definition of a manufactured home?
A: A manufactured home, as defined in Section 202 of the Zoning Ordinance is: “A structure, manufactured after June 15, 1976, transportable in one or more sections, which in the traveling mode, is 8 body feet or more in width and 40 body feet or more in length, and when erected on site, is 320 square feet or more in size, and which is built on a permanent chassis and designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation when connected to the required utilities, and includes the plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and electrical systems contained therein. Calculations used to determine the number of square feet in a manufactured home will be based on the exterior dimensions measured at the largest horizontal projections when erected on site. These dimensions will include all expandable rooms, cabinets, and other projections containing interior space, but do not include bay windows. The term "manufactured home" does not include recreational vehicles or factory built buildings (including modular) or mobile homes.”

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Q: What is the definition of a multi-sectional manufactured home?
A: A multi-sectional manufactured home, as defined in Section 202 of the Zoning Ordinance is: “A multi-sectional manufactured home not exceeding two (2) stories in height and manufactured after June 15, 1976, to standards established by the U.S. Department of Housing Urban Development that when joined forms a residence for human occupancy that measures sixteen (16) feet by forty (40) feet or larger and which is designed to be installed on a permanent foundation system when located on an individual lot of record in a rural or residential zoning district. A multi-sectional manufactured home shall have roofing and siding materials similar in appearance and kind to those used in site built homes.”

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Q: Where can I put my manufactured home?
A: A multi-sectional manufactured home can be placed in any location in which a site built home is permitted. All that is needed is a development permit. In addition, a single-wide manufactured/mobile home can be placed on individual rural lots through the Special Use Permit process, in a mobile home subdivision, or in a mobile home park.

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Q: How do I contact the State Office that regulates mobile and manufactured homes?
A: Click on the link provided: www.dfbls.az.gov

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Home Occupation FAQS
Q: Where/when can a business be operated from a residence?
A: There are two types of home occupation definitions in the Zoning Ordinance: 1) Residential home occupations, which are allowed as an accessory use in any rural or residential zoning district, (as defined in Section 202) – “An accessory use of a dwelling that involves very limited manufacture, provision, or sale of goods and/or services. “Garage/yard sales or home parties that are held for the sale of goods or services are not considered a home occupation provided these sales do not exceed six in one year. A residential home occupation is only permitted per the standards contained in the rural and single-family zoning districts. The standards for residential home occupations in rural zoning district are contained in Section 402.12 of the Zoning Ordinance. The standards for single-family residential zoning districts are contained in Section 702.9 of the Zoning Ordinance. The standards for rural and residential zones are different. 2) Cottage industries, which are permitted in rural zoning districts subject to obtaining a Special Use Permit, approved by the Board of Supervisors (as defined in Section 202) – “An accessory use of a dwelling that involves limited manufacture, provision or sale of goods and/or services. “Garage/yard sales or home parties held for the sale of goods or services are not considered a cottage industry provided these sales do not exceed six in one year. A cottage industry is a more intense use than a residential home occupation and is only permitted per the standards contained in the special use section in rural zoning districts. The standards for cottage industries are contained in Section 2401.1.ii of the Zoning Ordinance.

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Q: What determines if the activity occurring is a business?
A: The Zoning Ordinance does not list businesses (i.e. commercial activity) as a permitted primary use in rural or residential districts; however, many accessory commercial businesses can be permitted under the residential home occupation definition or the cottage industry definition assuming the required standards dealing with the level of activity and effects on surrounding properties are adhered to.

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Residential FAQS
Q: What is the definition of an accessory building?
A: Section 202 of the Zoning Ordinance, defines an accessory building as: “A building or structure which is subordinate to and the use of which is incidental to that of the principal building, structure or use on the same lot."

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Q: What determines if a building is an accessory?
A: The first criteria is that a lot must have a permitted primary use established (usually a dwelling unit). Next, the proposed accessory building must be clearly incidental to the established primary use (e.g. detached garage, home workshop, etc.)

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Q: Where should an accessory building be located on a property?
A: On any lot, an accessory building can be located at any location that the primary building can be located. In addition to the regular location standards, Section 2303 of the Zoning Ordinance, provides that an accessory building may not be constructed or established on a lot until construction of the principal building has actually commenced or the primary use established. Section 2303 also allows detached accessory buildings to be constructed within the required rear yard, subject to the following requirements:
a. Accessory buildings cannot occupy more than 30 percent of the required rear yard;
b. Accessory buildings cannot be closer than three feet to any side or rear property line in the required rear yard, and any projections (i.e., eaves) may not extend more than one foot beyond the walls of the building. If the accessory building is located in other than the required rear yard, they must meet all applicable setbacks for primary buildings. In a corner lot situation, the detached accessory building can be no closer to the street property line than one half the distance required in the front yard. Finally, if the detached accessory building garage entering an alley, it must be minimum of ten feet from the alley line.

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Q: How do I get electricity during construction of my home/business?
A: At the time a building permit is being obtained, construction power must be requested. If construction surpasses the rough topout state, construction power will not be issued. Temporary construction power may be secured for a residence at the time of permit application for the residence by mentioning to the building safety counter person that temporary construction power is needed. Once the building permit for the residence is issued, should the applicant need construction power, a “field change” may be issued by the building inspector. In either case, the applicant will receive instruction on setting up a temporary construction service and will be given the appropriate forms to fill out and sign. Temporary construction power for a business is left up to the discretion of the building inspector, since he will be more familiar with the project.

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Q: What is the procedure to have electricity turned on?
A: Once a permit is obtained and a final inspection has been performed, the inspector will direct staff to contact the servicing utility company with a clearance number to initiate this process.

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Commercial FAQS
Q: What is the definition of a church?
A: The Zoning Ordinance does not contain a definition for a “church”. A standard dictionary definition is acceptable. Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate dictionary defines “church” as “A building for public and especially Christian worship.”\

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Q: When/where is a church allowed?
A: Churches are permitted in rural and residential zoning districts as well as the C-1, C-2 and C-3 zoning districts.

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Q: When is a church school allowed?
A: Private schools with a curriculum customarily given in public schools, which applies to most church schools, are permitted in any zoning district where a public school is permitted. This includes any rural or residential zoning district and the C-1, C-2, or C-3 zoning districts.

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Temporary Power FAQS
Q: How do I get electricity during construction of my home/business?
A: At the time a building permit is being obtained, construction power must be requested. If construction surpasses the rough topout state, construction power will not be issued. Temporary construction power may be secured for a residence at the time of permit application for the residence by mentioning to the building safety counter person that temporary construction power is needed. Once the building permit for the residence is issued, should the applicant need construction power, a “field change” may be issued by the building inspector. In either case, the applicant will receive instruction on setting up a temporary construction service and will be given the appropriate forms to fill out and sign. Temporary construction power for a business is left up to the discretion of the building inspector, since he will be more familiar with the project.

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Q: What is the procedure to have electricity turned on?
A: Once a permit is obtained and a final inspection has been performed, the inspector will direct staff to contact the servicing utility company with a clearance number to initiate this process.

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Compliance / Special Inspection FAQS
Q: What is a Compliance Inspection?
A: A Compliance Inspection is a development permit issued to enable one inspection on one property. This type of permit is used in five specific instances.
A Compliance Inspection does NOT authorize work. Rather, it provides for a property inspection so that an inspector may assist a customer with the next step in the completion of their project.

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Q: When do I need a Compliance Inspection?
There are five instances where a compliance inspection is appropriate:
  1. Final Inspection: This is used when a permit had been previously ISSUED, but has since EXPIRED. This is a one time inspection and could be for a Final Building Inspection OR a Final Drainage Inspection. If both are necessary, then two Compliance Inspection permits are required. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied.
  2. Fire Damage: One time inspection where an inspector views property and structures to determine the extent of the fire damage. Result: A field report is prepared.
  3. Group Home: An inspection of an existing residential structure to ensure all requirements are met for occupancy as a group home with more than 5 occupants. A proper site plan, floor plan and Land Use Certificate application must be submitted for review. This permit is NOT issued over the Counter. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied.
  4. Code Compliance: An inspection of a building or structure to determine if in compliance with all county building codes. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied.
  5. Move On Structure: An inspection to ensure an existing structure intended to be moved into the County jurisdiction meets all structural requirements. Result: An inspection is either approved or denied.

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Q: Why Do I Need a Compliance Inspection?
To have a Maricopa County inspector advise you on the specific actions required in the completion of your project. This will help ensure; protection of your investment, protection for you and your family, protection of the public and future residents and protection of the environment.

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Q: How do I obtain a compliance inspection?
Complete a building application and contact supplemental form. You may retrieve these forms at our office location or online at under “Building Services.” Be sure to identify the type of Compliance Inspection you need. List any prior permits you may have, if applicable. With the exception of the Group Home, Compliance Inspection permits are issued over the counter. Please allow approximately one-hour to complete the process. The permit fee is $100 per Compliance Inspection. Once you have paid the fee(s), you will receive your issued permit. Be sure to post this permit at the work site.

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Agricultural Exemption FAQS
Q: My property is zoned agricultural. I don't need permits, do I?
A: Permits are required in all county zoning districts. There is no category of zoning called “agricultural:” Agricultural uses are allowed in the “Rural” zoning districts with proper permits.

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Q: My property is used for agriculture, is it exempt?
A: It may qualify, but minimum requirements have to be met. An application for an agricultural exemption must be processed and approved. An agricultural exemption certificate may then be issued. This exemption certificate authorizes the approved use of the property to be exempt from the County Building Codes, Zoning Ordinance and Drainage regulations. However, other regulatory agencies such as Flood Control & Environmental Services still have the authority to regulate.

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Q: What qualifies my property for an agricultural exemption?
A: It must be a minimum of five (5) contiguous commercial acres (175,000 square feet). More than one parcel is okay as long as they are contiguous. It must have an agricultural use classification assigned by the County Assessor's office. To receive this, an application to the Assessor's office is required. The use must qualify to be exempt as per the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance. An Agricultural Exemption Certificate must be issued by the Planning & Development Department.

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Q: Once I have received an exemption certificate, do I need permits in order build?
A: The approved land use file must contain representation (on a site plan) of the improvements which qualify as exempt. Those that do qualify will not be required to get permits from Planning & Development. However, improvements which are not incidental to the exempted use require permits and must meet applicable regulations.

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Q: How do I apply?
A: The land use application for an agricultural exemption certificate is available on the web. Select the “Information Packet & Application” on the Agricultural Exemption page.

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Q: What is an agricultural exemption?
A: The Zoning Ordinances states: “This Ordinance shall not prevent, restrict or otherwise regulate the use or occupation of land or improvements for railroad, mining, metallurgical, grazing or general agricultural purposes, if the tract/s concerned is/are 5 or more contiguous commercial acres in size (Note: 1 Commercial acre = 35,000 square feet)
  1. Property is not exempt from the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance and/or Building Safety Ordinance unless and until the Maricopa Planning and Development Department has issued a certificate of exemption for that property. In order to secure a certificate of exemption, an applicant shall submit a zoning clearance application, including site plan and other reasonable supporting documentation.
  2. Only property classified by the Maricopa County Assessor’s office or the Arizona Department of Revenue as property used for one of the purposes enumerated in the first paragraph of this section is eligible for exemption under this section. If property has been so classified, the property is exempt from the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance and/or Building Safety Ordinance, unless the Planning and Development Director independently determines that all or part of the property is not used primarily for one or more of the purposes enumerated in the first paragraph of this section.
  3. Any structures built under an exemption that do not meet the underlying zoning district and/or Building Safety Ordinance standards may be required to comply with said standards if, at a future date, the exemption is no longer applicable.

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Legal Non-Conforming FAQs
Q: What does legal nonconforming mean?
A: First, nonconforming means that the subject does not conform to current regulations; and therefore, is in violation of those regulations. In order to qualify as legal and still be nonconforming, the situation which does not meet current regulation must have lawfully existed before those regulations were effective. Once qualified, a legal nonconforming (grandfathered) situation exists.

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Q: This building is over 30 years old, is it legal nonconforming?
A: The Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance became effective on May 29, 1969. Structures lawfully built prior to that date will qualify for legal nonconforming status as long as the property lines have not been changed since then.

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Q: What is a legal nonconforming use?
A: The zoning district in which the property is located determines what uses are allowed on the parcel. A situation where the current use of that property or building(s) does not conform with the zoning but has been an on going use (without an interruption of 12 months or more) since before the zoning regulations took effect may qualify as a legal nonconforming use.

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Q: How do you determine if a use is legal non-conforming?
A: Staff researches legal non-conforming files located in the department to verify or find information on the use on the property. If we have no previous record or substantiation, the owner is required to provide independent third party documentation that the use is non-conforming. A site plan, indicating all uses and structures with setbacks, is also required. The information, when submitted and determined adequate, is retained in files and sorted by address.

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Q: What do I need to do to establish a legal nonconforming use or circumstance?
A: A public record must be documented and the burden of proof falls mostly to the applicant. A land use submittal for a Legal Nonconforming determination is required. Select the “Information Packet & Application” on our Legal Nonconforming webpage.

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Variance FAQS
Q: I own the property, so why can’t I build what I want and where I want it?
A: A structure must be compliant with the Maricopa County Zoning Ordinance, applicable building codes and all regulations before an approved building permit will be issued. All required inspections must be obtained before the structure receives a final inspection and/or a certificate of occupancy.

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Q: Will the Board of Adjustment consider my request?
A: You will be provided an opportunity to present your case to the Board at a hearing.

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Q: What are my chances of getting approved?
A: Staff is not allowed to answer that question since the Board makes the final determination. If you do not agree with the Board’s decision, you have the right to appeal it by filing an appeal with the Maricopa County Superior Court within thirty (30) days of the Board’s decision.

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Q: I don’t see why I have to do anything about an existing structure, since it was on the property when I purchased the site.
A: As the property owner, you are responsible for the zoning compliance of all structures on your property, whether you or a previous owner built it.

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Q: How long does it take for a case to be heard?
A: Typically 1 to 2 months if all the information is correct and revisions are not necessary. There are exceptions for hillside variances, drainage review, interpretations and complex requests.

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Q: There is a violation on my property. Does it continue while I have applied for a variance?
A: Yes, but the violation will be placed in administration remedy until the variance request has been heard by the Board.

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Q: Do I have to have a pre-application meeting?
A: Yes, they are mandatory for all variance requests. Your questions will be answered by a planner so that submissions are complete.

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Q: Whom do I contact for the pre-application meeting?
A: Call the Board of Adjustment secretary at 602-506-2364.

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Q: Is there a fee for a variance pre-application meeting?
A: No.

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Q: What types of cases are heard by the Board?
A: Deviations to the Zoning Ordinance with regard to applicable zoning standards (i.e. yard setbacks, lot coverage, lot area or width, etc), hillside and drainage regulations, interpretations, appeal of determinations and some temporary use permit requests.

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Temporary Use FAQS
Q: Why do I need a Temporary Use Permit?
A: Certain uses are not allowed on a property but may be necessary or desirable for a limited period of time and these uses can be carefully regulated through the issuance of a Temporary Use Permit.

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Q: What uses typically require a Temporary Use Permit?
A: Temporary Housing, Caretaker’s Quarters, Temporary Events, Temporary Seasonal Sales, Underage Occupancy, Off-Site Construction Yard, and Temporary Model Home Sales Complex.

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Q: Can a property have Temporary Housing?
A: Yes, for up to two years if the owner is constructing or reconstructing a permanent residence on the site and the building permit for the permanent residence remains active.

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Q: My parents are ill and need my care. Can I place another residence on my property until their condition changes?
A: Yes, with a notarized statement from their physician. The Temporary Use Permit for the caretaker’s quarters must be renewed annually. The additional residence shall not be permanent in nature and must be removed once the need is no longer valid or necessary.

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Q: Is a Temporary Use Permit necessary for a weekend or a seasonal event?
A: It depends on the specifics of the event and how large it may be, but generally yes. Any use shall be limited to 30 days and for no more than four (4) times per calendar year.

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Q: Does a Cell on Wheels (COW) need a Temporary Use Permit?
A: Yes

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Plan of Development FAQs
Q: What is a Plan of Development (POD)?
A: A Plan of Development (POD) is a site plan which describes how a parcel of land is proposed to be improved. It includes the outlines of all structures and site improvements, such as property lines, setbacks, driveways, landscaping, existing structures, proposed structures, utility connections, and more. Typically, a POD does not involve any entitlements - that is, there is no requirement to obtain additional approvals for the type of development proposed (i.e., zoning, variance, etc.) The POD review focuses on reviewing the entire project layout for basic design and compatibility and to ensure that a project meets applicable regulations and policies.

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Q: What is the difference between a POD and site plan submitted for a building permit?
A: Often the term plan of development and site plan are used interchangeably. However, in the case of a POD, the site plan must convey the conditions that will ultimately exist at build-out, whereas the site plan submitted for building or construction permits may only consider existing structures and those contemplated by the particular permit.

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Q: When is a POD required?
A: A POD is required for all non-residential zoning districts, two-family and multi-family developments, and all sites with a Unit Plan of Development (UPD), Planned Area Development (PAD), and Planned Development (PD) overlay.

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Q: Do I need a POD if I’m expanding a site that is already developed?
A: Yes. For any existing two-family, multi-family, or commercial developments, an as-built POD (subject to certain conditions and to a zoning clearance review and fee) will be allowed for any development existing prior to September 22, 2008. Industrial developments have a similar allowance, but subject to the existing effective date of October 15, 1984. An as-build POD is processed via a land use application with the average process time of two to three weeks. For proposals on existing two-family, multi-family, or commercial developments involving internal tenant improvements, additional wall sign, and other non layout changes or minor permits, only building permits will be required.

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Q: What is the POD process and how long is it?
A: Effective September 22, 2008, PODs are processed administratively by staff. Because this office has no control over the quality of submittals, nor the number of resubmittals required or the time it takes an applicant to make such resubmittal(s), the average processing timeframe is 90 days. Additionally, a number of reasons could require the POD to be forwarded to the Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Supervisors for review or appeal by either staff or the applicant.

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Q: May I process a POD with my Zone Change request?
A: Yes. A POD may be processed through the Planning and Zoning Commission and Board of Supervisors concurrent with a Zone Change request (under the Zone Change application) or it may be processed administratively (under a separate POD application). All Zone Change requests that require a POD will be charged as a Zone Change with Overlay and separate POD request will be charged accordingly. Therefore, if a Zone Change and POD are processed under one application at the same time, there is a financial savings.

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Q: How do I amend an approved POD?
A: Amendments to existing PODs or UPDs may be processed administratively via a Major or Minor Amendment process if they do not change or alter a Board of Supervisor’s approved development standard or stipulation of approval. The main difference between a major and minor proposal is in scope of work proposed and required fees.

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Q: Does a POD expire?
A: Yes. POD approvals are valid for two (2) years with a possible one (1) year extension. The POD approval will essentially “vest” with issuance of a building or construction permit.

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Q: Is a pre-application meeting required for a POD?
A: No, however it is recommended. Pre-application meetings are attended by representatives from planning, drainage review, zoning review, transportation, environmental services, and flood control. If the POD is submitted in conjunction with a request for a Zone Change, a pre-application meeting is required.

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Group Home FAQs
Q: Are group homes allowed in County Jurisdiction?
A: Yes. Group homes fall into two categories in the MCZO.
  1. Homes providing assisted living for the elderly with no more than ten residents (including live in caregivers) are allowed in the rural & residential zoning districts. Single family homes are subject to a separation minimum of 1320 feet and licensure requirements.
  2. Homes providing care for more than ten residents require a Special Use Permit.

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Q: How do I start a group home for no more than ten residents?
A: Complete & submit a "Land Use application for a group home". It is always a good idea to call the zoning information line before making major commitments to a location. Staff can research the location to make sure the separation minimum is met. Applications are available on the website. Follow the instructions provided in the "applicants guide".

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Q: The Arizona State Health Department requires that forms be signed by the zoning & building officials in order to get my license. How do I get them signed?
A: The Land Use application provided to Planning & Development requires the forms be a part of the submittal. Upon approval, the forms will be signed and returned to you. They then may become a part of your application to the State.

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Q: What if I want to provide care for troubled teens, recovering drug addicts, alcoholics, or just provide day care?
A: These facilities are not allowed in category a), a Special Use Permit or possibly a change in zoning will be required.

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Q: Is an inspection required?
A: Yes, a compliance inspection is part of the process. For existing single family homes, residential building codes apply. If the home plans to have more than five residents, a fire sprinkler system is required. In the case of a new build group home, the building code definition of a group home applies. This requires the home to meet commercial group home building safety codes.

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