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Frequently Asked Questions

What is "Particulate Matter"?
When do I need to obtain a dust control permit?
What is the cost of a dust control permit?
Can I e-mail or fax my application?
What else would require a dust control permit?
How long does the dust control permit remain active?
How do I renew my permit?
Can a subcontractor obtain a dust control permit?
Do I have to get a dust control permit for discing or using a gander box to clear weeds?
If mud tracks out onto a paved public roadway, how long do I have to clean it up?
What is a project information sign and why do we have to have one?
How long does the dust control permit process take?
Should I have a dust control permit before conducting activity on an issued grading and drainage permit or building permit?
What happens if my employees or subcontractors do not follow the dust rules?
Do Utility companies working on my site have to follow the same air quality rules?
Where can I get help filling out the dust control application?
Where can I drop off my dust control application?
How do you make sure all applications are received from legal, Arizona companies?

Select a question above to view the answer.

Q. What is Particulate Matter?

A. Particulate matter pollution consists of very small liquid and solid particles floating in the air. Of greatest concern to the public health are the particles small enough to be inhaled into the deepest parts of the lung. These particles are less than 10 microns in diameter--about 1/5th the thickness of a human hair--and are known as PM10. This includes fine particulate matter known as PM2.5. PM10 is a major component of air pollution that threatens both our health and our environment.

Construction activities disturbing the soil within Maricopa County are regulated by the Maricopa County Air Quality Department. Although regulations require everyone to minimize emissions from dust generating operations, projects that have a total disturbed surface area of 1/10 acre (4,356 sq ft) or more are required to obtain a valid Dust Control Permit. The project is required to have a valid permit before the soil is disturbed.

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Q. When do I need to obtain a dust control (dust control) permit?

A. Whenever your activity will disturb 1/10th acre (4,356sq.ft.) or more. This area of disturbance includes stockpiles, storage and equipment yards and the area being disturbed. A more extensive list of examples of dust-generating activities can be found in Section 1 of the Dust Abatement Handbook.


The dust control permit application package is available: click here

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Q. What is the cost of a dust control permit?

A. The cost of your permit will depend on the number of acres involved. For example, a dust control permit for less than one acre will cost $795. Conversely, a dust control permit for six acres will cost $1,325. For further information on permit fees, please click here.

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Q. Can I e-mail or fax my application?

A. Applications must be submitted with an original signature and payment. Applications can be mailed and dropped off to our main office at 1001 North Central Avenue, Suite 125, Phoenix, AZ 85004 or hand delivered to the One Stop Shop at 501 North 44th Street, Suite 200, Phoenix, AZ 85008. Fax and e-mail applications are not accepted.

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Q. What else would require a dust control permit?

A. The demolition of a building, import/export operation, borrow pit, or mining operations that do not require a stationary source permit. A stationary source is defined as “Any source that operates at a fixed location that emits or generates regulated air pollutants.” [Rule 100 §200.105]

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Q. How long does the dust control permit remain active?

A. One year from the date of issue.

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Q. How do I renew my permit?

A. This is a reapplication process so you will need to submit a dust control application. The disturbed acreage may be reduced by any area that has undergone final stabilization (e.g. hardscape or landscape). Remember to reapply at least two weeks before your permit expires.

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Q. Can a subcontractor obtain a dust control permit?

A. No, only the owner, developer or the prime general contractor is authorized. The county wants the permit holder to have authority on site from the beginning to the end of the job and have authority over all persons working on the job site.

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Q. Do I have to get a dust control permit for discing or using a gander box to clear weeds?

A. Yes, weed abatement is a permitted activity.

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Q. If mud tracks out onto a paved public roadway, how long do I have to clean it up?

A. If the track-out is less than twenty-five feet it must be cleaned by the end of the day. If the track-out is twenty-five feet or more, it must be cleaned immediately.

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Q. What is a project information sign and why do we have to have one?

A. Project information signs are required for projects permitted for five acres or more. The project information sign must have a white background and black four-inch letters. The sign lists the Project Name, Permit Name, Permit Number, Name and Phone Numbers of responsible on site personnel and the phone number to the Air Quality Department to report a violation.

The project sign allows a neighbor or citizen observing poor dust control practices an opportunity to directly address the problem with the contractor in charge of the project. If the citizen does not obtain satisfaction from the contractor they should call the listed complaint line and formally file a citizen's complaint. An air quality inspector will be assigned to the complaint and make every effort to resolve all issues as quickly as possible.


Additional instructions and examples can be found at: http://www.maricopa.gov/aq/divisions/compliance/dust/Resources.aspx#project_sign

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Q. How long does the dust control permit process take?

A. For completed applications the process can take up to 14 days. If an incomplete application is submitted approval time will depend on responsiveness of the applicant.

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Q. Should I have a dust control permit before conducting activity on an issued grading and drainage permit or building permit?

A. Yes.

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Q. What happens if my employees or subcontractors do not follow the dust rules?

A. Maricopa County Air Pollution Regulations Rule 310 contains specific requirements that must be followed to prevent fugitive dust emissions from earthmoving activities. A permit holder is responsible for persons on site who violate the Maricopa County Air Pollution Control Regulation and may be subject to Notice of Violation issued by a County Inspector.

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Q. Do Utility companies working on my site have to follow the same air quality rules?

A. Yes, the same rules apply. If a utility company or their subcontractor causes fugitive dust emissions ask them to modify their activity or call in a citizen complaint at (602) 372-2703. The utility company or its contractor will have a dust control or Block permit and dust control plan with the same type of requirements.

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Q. Where can I get help filling out the dust control application?

A. For assistance in filling out dust control applications, please contact the Permitting Division at (602) 506-6010 or by e-mail at AQPermits@mail.maricopa.gov.

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Q. Where can I drop off my dust control application?

A. One Stop Shop was created as a way to streamline Maricopa County customer service by offering all customer service needs in one location. Drop off your dust permit applications at the following locations:



Air Quality Department Main Office

1001 North Central Avenue, Suite 125

Phoenix, AZ 85004


Maricopa County Planning and Development

501 North 44th Street, Suite 200

Phoenix, Arizona 85008

(on 44th Street, north of Van Buren)

(602) 372-1071


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Q. How do you make sure all applications are received from legal, Arizona companies?

A. The Maricopa County Air Quality Department requires all applicants be registered with the Arizona Corporation Commission before their application is approved. As per A.R.S. §10-1501, a corporation SHALL NOT transact business in this state without obtaining authority from the Commission. The requirements our department follows can be found on the Arizona Corporation Commission website here. Click on "Arizona Laws" then scroll over "Corporations Statutes" and visit chapters 15 and 38 to view these requirements.



Air Quality Department Main Office

1001 North Central Avenue, Suite 125

Phoenix, AZ 85004


Maricopa County Planning and Development

501 North 44th Street, Suite 200

Phoenix, Arizona 85008

(on 44th Street, north of Van Buren)

(602) 372-1071

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