Permit, Certification & Notification Types

Asbestos Notifications


The Maricopa County Air Quality Department regulates all asbestos renovation and demolition within Maricopa County under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). Anyone performing demolition and/or renovation activities that may involve friable asbestos-containing material greater than or equal to 160 square feet, 260 linear feet, or 35 cubic feet (as determined by an Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) certified asbestos building inspector) must file a notification with the Air Quality Department prior to demolition or renovation. See the Asbestos section for more information.

Dust Control Permits


The department issues dust control (or earthmoving) permits when earthmoving operations disturb an area greater than one tenth of an acre of land (4,356 square feet). Earthmoving operations are activities that use any equipment that may generate fugitive dust. Some examples include blasting, cutting and filling, demolition, drilling, excavating, grading, leveling, trenching, and weed abatement by discing or blading.

For more information about dust control, visit the Dust Sources page.

Dust Control Training


If you are involved in a dust-generating operation, of if your work involves processing concrete, asphalt or rock products (including crushing or screening rock products), you may need dust control training. Dust control certification is achieved by taking the appropriate dust control training class. Dust control training classes are offered on line and at the Air Quality offices. See Do You Need Dust Control Training? for more details.

General Permits


The General Permit program offers an alternative to regular permits and simplifies the process for authorizing operation. A source must first qualify for a General Permit before an Authority to Operate is issued for the following types of sources:
  • asphalt kettles
  • crematories
  • dry cleaners
  • fuel burning
  • gasoline fuel dispensing
  • graphic arts
  • stationary dust-generating sources
  • stationary emergency internal combustion engines
  • surface coating
  • vehicle refinishing
  • wastewater treatment plants
  • woodworking
See General Permit Information for more information.

Open Burn Permits


The department regulates all open outdoor fires. The purpose of this program is to limit the emissions of air contaminants that are produced from open burning. For more information on open burning permits and restrictions, visit the Burning Activities page.

Non-Title V Permits


The department issues Non-Title V permits to sources that are below Title V (major source) emission thresholds. The permits include conditions that regulate source-specific emission limits, monitoring, operational requirements, record keeping, and reporting.
Synthetic Minor
The department's Non-Title V permitting program issues Synthetic Minor permits for sources with actual emissions of at least 50% of the major source emissions thresholds. The permits include conditions that regulate source-specific emission limits, monitoring, operational requirements, record keeping, and reporting.

Subcontractor Registration


Any subcontractor who is engaged in dust-generating operations at a site that is subject to a Maricopa County dust control permit is required to register. See Subcontractor Registration for more information.

If you are engaged in dust-generating operations, you may also need dust control training. See Do You Need Dust Control Training? for more details.

Tanker Truck Certification (Vapor Recovery)


All gasoline delivery vessels in Maricopa County must pass an annual pressure test to ensure that they are vapor-tight and leak-free. Results must be submitted to the Air Quality Department. For more information, see the Tanker Truck Certification page.

Title V Permits


The Air Quality Department issues Title V permits to facilities that emit significant amounts of air pollutants. Title V of the federal Clean Air Act requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish a national, operating permit program for major sources of emissions across the country. The EPA allows states and local permitting authorities, such as the Air Quality Department, to operate a federally enforceable permitting program. For all implementing agencies in the country, there are standard requirements for permit programs and permit content.